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We help vulnerable children in Nepal, who are either in slavery or at risk of being trafficked into slavery. Read some of our rescue stories below.

rescue in progress

Deepack before and afterDeepak

Deepak’s home was flattened by the earthquake in April 2015. In desperation, he travelled to Kathmandu to find work to support his family. The little boy from a rural village was easy prey for the traffickers.

Several months later, our staff discovered Deepak in a metalwork factory. Forced to work with dangerous gases and chemicals, the wounds on his raw hands told of his suffering. There were many other boys in the factory, working 13-hour days and sleeping huddled together on the cold floor each night. Deepak was the worst affected of all. He told us how he had tried to escape on three separate occasions only to be captured, brought back and beaten by the factory owner. As punishment Deepak had to take on extra tasks in addition to his already long working day. He would only be fed if the factory owner said he had worked hard enough. When he became sick and couldn’t work, he wasn’t fed.

We took Deepak and the other boys to a safe house where they were provided with food, clothes, medical attention and counselling. Deepak is now healthy, happy and eager to complete his education with our support. We have taken Deepak to visit his family and hope to permanently reunite them once they are able to provide for him. In the meantime we will continue to care for and support Deepak so that he can learn what it is a to be a child again, and start back at school.

Sita and Hari and familySita and Hari

With their disabled father unable to work and their mother foraging for food in the forest, Sita and Hari were easy prey for slave traffickers. Lured away to work in a carpet factory, the grim reality quickly became apparent — they were child slaves.

Working with the local police, we freed Sita and Hari from the terrible conditions and long hours of factory life and took them to a safe house. They have since been receiving counselling, medical care and support with their studies. We will continue to support Sita and Hari for as long as they need us. The long term effects of their suffering and abuse are still evident, but with our support they are making good progress and learning what it is to have a childhood.

With more slaves in the world than at any other point in history, Child Rescue Nepal’s work is desperately needed.

MantriMantri

Three years ago, Mantri left home with his friends to find a job in Kathmandu. When he got there, he started working in a carpet factory, where he stayed for two and a half years before asking the owner for his salary. Infuriated, the factory owner started beating Mantri.

Mantri managed to escape and found another job, this time in a restaurant. After the first two months working long hours he realised he was being taken advantage of and asked the owner for his pay cheque. The question got him and his colleagues brutally assaulted.

We were called by the police to help Mantri. After tracking his parents, our staff found out his mother was psychologically unable to care for him and his father spent most of his income on alcohol. Mantri has been living in one of our safe homes, where he can get the support, attention and help he needs to succeed.

 

The fight goes on

There are still thousands of child slaves in the factories, restaurants and brothels of Nepal, and we won’t stop until every one of them is free.